ATRA Webinar Series – CEUs you can use

Hello there –

Disclaimer: I am a Lifetime Member of the American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA). I am not an elected member of the ATRA board. I am not a paid spokesperson for ATRA. I am just a member of the association passing along information.

Here is the email:

We are excited to announce the
2017 ATRA Webinar Series
is open for registration.
With six different series available, and 19 new innovative webinars, there’s bound to be something perfect for you.
We’ve got great topics and fantastic speakers for you to choose from. And the best part is they are all CEU-approved (make sure to check on CEU registration when you sign-up).
You will walk away from each webinar with tangible learning outcomes that can help you at your workplace.
Can’t pick just one? Be sure to sign up for the entire series at a cost savings to you.
If you can’t listen live, make sure you order the replay version (after each webinar takes place, we will add the replay purchase information in the ATRA Bookstore).
For more information on each series and registration information click the series title below.
Questions? Contact ATRA at membership@atra-online.com or call 703.234.4140

 

11130 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite 350
Reston, VA 20191

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ATRA goes with Drohan Management Group

Marilyn Radatz, MS, CTRS, the current ATRA President (2016-2017) sent an email to announce that:

canstockphoto13621557-1ATRA is now using Drohan Management Group for Association Management Services.

 

My personal thoughts, I hate that our association is going to lose Kelly Evans (at Association Management Systems). She is such a wonderful person.

 

My thoughts on the new group are positive. Drohan Management Group is located in Reston, Virginia, which is right outside of D.C. I think it is great that ATRA has a location close to D.C. again.

 

Another thought: I hope ATRA decides to go back to the mid-year conference in D.C. every other year. I don’t think they will because of numbers. I think we, ATRA members need to make the numbers happen. The day on the hill is very helpful to advocating what we, recreational therapists do.

 

Danny Pettry, ATRA Lifetime Member

Bleisure trip

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Word of the day: Bleisure trip:

This is when people take a business trip (and they include leisure time).

Used in a sentence, by Danny Pettry:

I imagine many recreational therapists who are heading out to Orlando, FL for the next American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA) conference are taking a bleisure trip.

Based on my personal experiences, all of my ATRA experiences had been bleisure trips.

I enjoy learning. It is something I do for a hobby, so conferences are very rewarding (as well as tiring).

There has been something FUN to do in each town ATRA holds their conferences based on my experiences.

Some people go golfing. I can recall many people going golfing at a conference in Greenville, South Carolina. (I believe it was a Southeastern Symposium conference). I don’t golf (unless it has a windmill and a waterfall and something entertaining).

I always go out to the local restaurants with fellow recreational therapists. So many fun places in every town. I always stop by the mall and shopping center in each town. Those are things I find enjoyable.

Here are some of my experiences that I recall:

  • Kansas City, Missouri: World War I Museum, big former train-station, Hallmark headquarters, Craolya headquarters, Kansas City chiefs (I wanted to go see them play real bad, but didn’t get to for some reason). They have a real nice restaurant that brings your food out on small trains. So cool. Oh yeah – they have a real neat model map of the town. You can push a button (for where you want to go) and a light pops up to show you where that part is at).
  • District of Columbia: a lot of museums. Metro subway was neat.
  • Bloomington, Indiana: Colts! Hoosier state (Indiana University). Real nice mall in downtown Bloomington.
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota: we took a riverboat down the Mississippi, which was one of the most entertaining and relaxing activities. I also stopped by the Mall of America.
  • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: This is like a really giant version of Charleston, West Virginia (with more to do). I ate with my good friend and mentor Charlie Dixon and his wife at the HardRock Café there. Charlie won the distinguished fellow of the year award by ATRA. A lot of sports: Penguins, Pirates, Steelers.
  • Chattanooga, Tennessee: quaint town with a lot of culture in downtown. Spent the day walking around the park with fellow Rec Therapists and we found some real nice restaurant there.
  • Chicago Illinois: wow – that city is just too big for me. I felt a bit scared there. Luckily the conference was slightly outside of Chicago. I went to the local mall with fellow rec therapists. But I didn’t do anything else there. A few RTs told me they ran into some suspicious characters. There were some special events and activities at the conference. Some girls were having a hoola-hooping contest!

Origin of the Recreation Therapy (and certification) submitted by Kenneth Davis

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This blog was post submitted by Kenneth Davis for RecTherapyToday

  • The origin of the Recreation Therapy profession dates back to the early 80s when the first meeting of certification  was part of a national discussion.
  • Norma Stumbo, PH D was probably  key in developing a study guide for the  administration of the National exam given by athe National  Council for Thetapeutic  Recreation Certification now in New York.
  • Academic  development was with Dr. Scout Gunn PhD and Macia Carter, PhD and many others
  • My memory is that Dr.Peg Connelly  PhD and later a Bob Rilely, PhD  were very involved in promoting and developing the exam an making changes to the credentialing process.  Adding a staff for credentialing and having clear discussion on the job analysis http://nctrc.org/about-certification/national-job-analysis/
  • I believe, a national  testing service ETS was to review the exam before it was administered and Dr. Stumbo released a study guide later for the exam.  Additionally  individuals like Alice Burlingame were very involved in assessment  development with https://www.idyllarbor.com/. I known Alice for years and she has sold the business.
  • Additionally  Dr. Connie,Nall, and myself  worked with Leisure Scope.a developed tool for leisure assessment. Jean Forthworth, PhD  then at Central  Michigan University, and I had many discussion  on this including Dr. Marsha Cater at Michigan State University  in Lansing,  Michigan.
  • The exam and through careful developed and determining of the questions and submitting to a national testing service was critical.  Some of the concern  included accommodation for the exam for individuals with disabilities. I remember  Dr. Nancy Navar was also involved in this discussion. Dr. Navar is now retired from the University of Wisconsin at La Crosse.
  • Ed Keegan , PhD  was also developing the program at Western Carolina University and Dr. Gerald O Morrow was reaching retirement .
  •  The National Recreation and Parks Administration  NTRS was developing their own certificate. It was a bit divided and most NRPA members were not in favor of a separate certification of a Governing Body to address this issue which was NTRS.
  • Many years had gone by until thongs were actually worked out with NTRS believe at least 10 years or more. Most Parks and Recreation majors in colleges did not understand this aspect of therapeutic recreation nor a need to have certification. But stardardard for placement  were just about all that wree in place at that time. http://www.recreationtherapy.com/history/rthistory3.htm
  • Yvonne Washington, was a central person addressing this discussion with NTRS  individually with the National  Recreation and Parks Association.  Later they had  the discussion which  moved to colleges and universities and  TR sections including the Virginia Therapeutic Recreation Section, which I was a part in the 80s with Besty Kennedy MA Ed at Old Domunnion with so many other TR’s addresses the exam at Radford  and Old Dominion University  and Virginia Commonwealth  University.
  • In the mid 80s schools like Michigan State, Wayne State, University of Tennessee at Knoxville and Texas  and University of Washington, Radford  and California State were all involved in promoting the national exam.  I do remember Mick and Lee being involved at Radford as well. In fact Lee was very gracious in ;coming to Marion Virginia where I was the department head to be involved in the selection position for a job I had written specifically for our agency.  At that time I worked for Marion Correctional Treatment Center a forensic facility in Southwestern Virginia.
  • Sharon Nicholas, MA CTRS  in New Hampshire whom I’ve known over the years and still in New Hampshire was working on explaining our value in the rehabilitation settings.  I kept in contact with Sharon while m working for the VA in Manchester New Hampshire and while at Health South in Concord New Hampshire,
  • I later moved from New Hampshire to Colorado  but in  Virginia with some knowledge of the happening in both the West and East Coast because I was in contact with Ann Houston.
  • Ann Houston, MPH, CTRS, became the President of ATRA, and this was after her leaving the VA in a Palo Alto, California.  Ann spearheaded ATRA  to a much larger need and audience. With its offices in Hattersburg,  Mississippi.
  • As a member of ATRA, I remember having many discussion with Kelly Dunbar, about the formation and direction of ATRA, and NCTRC.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreational_therapy?wprov=sfla1

  • ATRA, became very involved in therapeutic recreation both locally and on Capital Hill. During the Clinton administration health care reform years , The Joint Commission o established that lTR was a part of treatment.   Many of its members ATRA including myself went to Washington DC in 1980s  to speak on behalf of the organization to our local representatives dto educate  them on the three hour rule of health care reimbursment, which continues today

Kenneth Davis MA CTRS,  is now a Independent Therapeutic Educational Consultant and Chief Executive of tge Business  Educational Planning and Counseling Services LLC www.educational-planning-and-counseling.org

Kenneth  is a graduate of Pepperdine  University holding Masters in Educational Technology and Organizational Leadership currently Certified by NCTRS. Business Owner, CEO Educational Planning and Counseling Services Lives in Sun City Wesrt, Arizona

RT book project

I’ve been advocating for several months to get Chicken Soup for the Soul to create a book of stories about the healing power of recreational therapy.

I’ve met a lot of resistance.

I’ve contacted Chicken Soup by mail and they’ve said “no,” too narrow of a topic.

I drove to Chicago one weekend to meet Jack Canfield, the co-creator of Chicken Soup to get his support and he sent my message on to Chicken Soup (a company and brand that he sold). – but they still said no.

I’ve created an online petition to request them to create the book (but only 400 signatures)  – but Chicken Soup said “no.” – They need millions of signatures.

I’ve contacted NCTRC and asked them to submit a letter to Chicken Soup, but they didn’t because the mission of NCTRC to is protect the public from harm.

I ‘ve contacted ATRA and asked them to write a letter to Chicken Soup, but they said it wouldn’t be fair to all the members of ATRA.

My last letter from Chicken Soup said “return to sender.”

Emotions: I feel invalidated. I feel rejected. I feel distressed.

But don’t despair.

I Danny Pettry am determined. I promise that I’ll continue to advocate until this book project gets approved.

I’m going to get this book published. I hope with Chicken Soup.

I really think Chicken Soup is making a huge mistake to disregard recreational therapy.

My second choice is Hay House.  My team has reached out to them and they are open to book proposals. What do you think?

I have another appointment to meet with Jack Canfield in 2017 in Philly. I’ll keep you posted.

ATRA benefits

I’m a lifetime member of the American Therapeutic Recreation Association.

I feel ATRA is the leading organization for promoting the interests of recreational therapists.

Disclaimer: I am not an elected official for ATRA. I am not a paid spokesperson for ATRA.

My Request: please join this professional organization. Your membership fees will go towards promote and advocating for our profession. Once you’re member, go a step more and volunteer with one of the groups.

Go to this link to join ATRA: https://www.atra-online.com/welcome/become-a-member

I volunteer my own time to help ATRA with several parts, including:

  • Reviewing Peg Connolly Scholarship applications
  • Training Peg Connolly Scholarship winners at previous conferences
  • Assisting with the Peg Connolly Scholarship program
  • I’m on the Public Policy team with an emphasis on Mental/ Behavioral Health
  • I presented at three ATRA conferences: Chicago, Pittsburgh, and D.C.
  • I write articles for the ATRA newsletter from time to time.
  • I’m a member of the pediatric and mental/ behavior health treatment networks, which I assist.

PLUS – I’ve made so many great connections with friends because of ATRA.

What are you doing to do for your profession?

Go to this link to join ATRA: https://www.atra-online.com/welcome/become-a-member

Bulletproofing Recreational Therapy

A book Review of Stephen Viscusi’s (2008) book, Bulletproof your job

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Licensed permission to use image from (c) CanStockPhoto

  • Viscusi, S. (2008). Bulletproof your job: 4 simple strategies to ride out the rough times and come out on top at work. New York, NY: HarperCollins.

Book Review By: Danny Pettry

            Politicians often say, “If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu” to argue the importance of being involved. Those people who are not at the table and not involved risk having their services being “cut” and discontinued by those people that are involved.

Recreational therapists need to be involved and have a seat at the table to bulletproof their job. However, the focus of the profession is not about saving our own jobs. It is about the people that receive recreational therapy services. Our job in being involved consists of making sure people (consumers of recreational therapy) are getting the greatest outcomes. The focus is on ensuring and advocating that consumers are getting access to these cost-efficient recreational therapy services that are bringing about functional outcomes.

Health care services cost a lot of money. Those services that are not bringing about measurable outcomes are deemed not necessary. Those services risk being cut and discontinued. Recreational therapy has evidenced-based research that supports what we do. It is vital that recreational therapists are involved, having a seat at the table, and active in advocating for the consumers of recreational therapy services.

Stephen Viscusi (2008) points out four strategies people can use to keep their job. This book review outlines Viscusi’s four simple strategies and provides additional focus for those people who are professional Recreational Therapists to be involved (at a national public policylevel)

Viscusi’s (2008) four simple strategies to bulletproofing a job consist of being:

  1. Visible;
  2. Easy;
  3. Useful; and
  4. Ready

Recreational therapists could apply Viscusi’s (2008) four simple strategies in order to advocate for our professional services and the outcomes that they help achieve.

 

Being Visible

            Viscusi (2008) points out the importance of being seen. Viscsi argues that this means seen doing the right things. Appearance must be professional. Employee must show up on time for work (or early) and do extra. The employee must be consistently hardworking, providing real value to the company. The employee is seen as going the extra mile to volunteer to lead special projects.

Recreational therapists do a lot of these already. They are passionate, genuine, enthusiastic, positive, polite, considerate, good listeners.

Some tips for Recreational Therapists to be visible:

Get involved in public policy with the American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA). Be a leader and volunteer to take initiative to organize efforts (at a state level for your own state and on a national level). Be present (by having a seat at the table) by participating in public policy. Send ATRA an email and ask how you can help with public policy in your state and at a national level.

 

Being Easy

            Viscusi (2008) points out the importance of being easy. This concept is based on being easy to get along with opposed to being the difficult employee. Difficult employees whine, complain, and make things miserable for others. Employers are more likely to get rid of difficult employees.

Recreational therapists as a whole often demonstrate the characteristics of being easy-going.  These concepts consist of being calm and collect, having a positive attitude, being flexible, and agreeable.

            Some tips for Recreational Therapists on being easy:

Get involved in your professional organization: The American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA). Apply your easy-going skills towards making new connections and networking with other professionals. Demonstrate a positive attitude and volunteer to help the professional association with tasks.

 

Being Useful

            Viscusi (2008) argues that being useful is a key to keeping a job. This consists of doing more than what you’re expected to do. Sometimes they call it “going the extra mile.” It is doing “extra credit” work when you already have a solid A+ grade. Being useful is about helping the company reach goals. It is the opposite of blaming and making excuses when job responsibilities are not completed. It is quite easy for a company to le employees like this go.

 

Some tips for Recreational Therapists on being useful:

Become a specialist. Go above and beyond your entry-level Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) credential. The National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC) offers five specialty certifications, including: behavioral health, physical medicine and rehab, developmental disabilities, geriatrics, and community. Specialists provide additional value to the company. A person with the specialization could be sought out for advice in their area of expertise. They could assist with training others in the company.

 

Being Ready

            Viscusi (2008) argues the importance of being prepared and ready. Changes happen all the time. Anything can happen. People that are prepared are the ones who are going to come out on top. Those people that are not prepared are going to be the ones that are left behind or let go.

Some tips for Recreational Therapists to be ready:

Our world is changing. Health care is changing as well. Recreational therapists need to be knowledgably of what is happening in the world, in health care, and in their own profession. Consider going the extra mile to earn a graduate degree or a doctorate. One change our profession is facing is the shortage of qualified people to teach undergraduates and graduate students.

 

Conclusion

            There are things a single individual person can do to bulletproof her (or his) own job. Viscusi (2008) did an excellent job arguing how being visible, easy-going, useful, and prepared can be beneficial.

Recreational therapists as a whole could apply Viscusi’s (2008) concepts to bulletproof the profession. There is an old story about four bulls and one hungry tiger. The tiger could easily take out any one single bull. However, the four bulls put their back tails together. They form a circle and watch out for each other. The tiger is not able to get any one single bull when they have their horns out and form a circle. The tiger gets them when they are alone.

Recreational therapists are more vulnerable when they are alone. However, they do not need to be alone. We have a professional association that forms a circle. However,  recreational therapists must join the circle (the association) in order to be involved.

Recreational therapists can be:

  • Visible when they are part of a group association
  • Easy-going by working with others in the profession and building a network of professional friends.
  • Useful by volunteering to work on the many roles and responsibilities of the national association.
  • Ready for what changes happen next. The association will spread the knowledge through their email network to those involved.

 

Bibliography

  • Viscusi, S. (2008). Bulletproof your job: 4 simple strategies to ride out the rough times and come out on top at work. New York, NY: HarperCollins.

 

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Danny Pettry is a full-time practitioner. He has provided services for children with abuse-reactive needs at a psychiatric residential treatment facility since 2002. Pettry has graduate degrees in Mental Health Counseling (Linsey Wilson College, Columbia, Kentucky, 2012) and Recreational Therapy (Indianan University, Bloomington, Indiana, 2006). Pettry is a lifetime member of the American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA). Pettry is not a hired representative, elected member, or spokesperson for the association. This blog is written by Danny Pettry (an individual).

Now is the time to get a Ph.D. in Rec Therapy!

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Picture above: Left: Cari Autry; Right: Syd Sklar

Reasons to get a Ph.D. in Recreational Therapy

I had the wonderful opportunity to attend a training session titled: “Graduate Study and Careers in RT High Education.” This session was presented by Cari Autry, Ph.D., CTRS and Sydney Sklar, Ph.D., CTRS on Sun. Sept. 11, 2016 at the ATRA conference in Chicago.

Cari Autry and Sydney Sklar both received earned their doctorate degrees from Florida International University.

Recreational therapy is lacking faculty, particularly those with doctorates in RT higher education.

They suggested that we in the audience could be the key to the survival of our profession. They high recommend for others to get their doctorate or master’s degree. There were several of us in the room who already had a master’s degree, including myself, and one girl from Iowa. There were several students in master degree and doctorate programs.

DannyPettry: I’m very pleased and happy to see so many people doing this. The need is high.

According to a recent study, there were only 9 doctorate students in 2009. Recently there were 12 open positions at colleges and universities needing an individual with a doctorate.

In a nutshell: we need more professors.

Overall, a person with a Ph.D. and CTRS credential is pretty much guaranteed a job due to the number of positions that are needed.

A person with a Ph.D. in a related field with CTRS and background experience in Recreational Therapy would also be well-suited for these positions.

Those with a master’s degree in the field and with experience working in the field would be eligible for adjunct faculty positions. They recommended those with M.A/ M.S. degree to volunteer to be a guest lecture for a day at these colleges. This could be a good way to get your foot in the door.

DannyPettry: if you got a full-time position as faculty with master’s degree then you might want to work on earning your doctorate while teaching and being on campus.

What does getting a doctorate degree take?

  • 30 credits hours that consists of research methods and statistics
  • Additional credits in content/ area of specialty
  • Dissertation

There are a lot of classes on statistics. I suggested that Syd S. to write a book, statistics made easy for people.

The dissertation process consists of:

  • Topic
  • Prospects
  • Data Collection
  • Results/ conclusion
  • Defense (date and defend dissertation
  • Graduation!

 

Benefits of being a college professor:

  • Creativity
  • Autonomy
  • Sabbatical leave
  • Summer off (Dr. David Austin sent me a message and said that few have summer off). Based on my personal experience: I took summer classes every year so I know a lot work during the summers too.
  • Flexible schedule
  • Campus life – music, art, speakers,
  • Culture of the campus and town
  • Sometimes kids go to college free (if you’re a professor)

Pay:

  • Jobs outlook claimed that an assistant professor salary is: $65,372. Of course this will vary/ range.
  • 2013: The Economists: RT least likely to be replaced by technology.
  • RT ranked among 10-best paying jobs for a bachelor’s degree (Monster.com)

NOW IS THE TIME TO GET A DOCTORATE DEGREE.

The focus of this session was on the need for doctorates because there is a growing need for college and university professors to teach programs.

It is noted that Barbar K. (had posted on the Therapeutic Recreation Directory on Facebook these additional thoughts:

<meta http-equiv=”refresh” content=”0; URL=/recreationtherapy?_fb_noscript=1″ />“My only additional thought is that there are other uses for the Ph.D. besides professor or research. It would be particularly beneficial to people in private practice, independent contractors, consultants, writers (wink) and in other settings.”

 

Danny Pettry comments:

I ran into Tim Passmore (Oklahoma University). He told me it was time for me to get my doctorate.

I, Danny Pettry, am seriously thinking about it. I’d complete the program through Clemson’s distance education.

Danny Pettry with ATRA board members

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9/13/2016 – ATRA, Chicag-Area

From left to right: Dawn De Vries, (Danny Pettry), Marilyn Radatz, and Tim Passmore

  • Dawn De Vries served as President of ATRA for the 2015 to 2016 term.
  • Danny Pettry (myself) became a Lifetime Member of ATRA during this year.
  • Marilyn Radatz is the current 2016-2017 President of ATRA!
  • Tim Passmore currently serves as the Secretary of ATRA.  Tim is also an associated editor for the Annual in Therapeutic Recreation.

Thank you Kelly Evans!

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Kelly Evans works at the American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA) office.

She is great!

I first met Kelly in Kansas City, Missouri at the 2004 ATRA Conference. I had won the Peg Connolly Scholarship that year as a student in the Recreational Therapy master’s degree program at Indiana University. This was the 20-year anniversary conference for ATRA 1984-2004! I got to work with the fellow Peg Connolly scholarship winners to put together the tote-bags for people who attended the conference. Kelly was all over the place.

She was right there in 2009 in Minneapolis at the ATRA conference during the year that I assisted with the Peg Connolly Scholars.

Every year, she calls me, “Peg!” Chattanooga, Pittsburgh, Washington D.C.

I appreciate all she does at the office for our professional association!

Thanks, Kelly.

I do want to give a shout out to a few more people at the ATRA office too, including: Lamar Evans, Tina Jenkins, Toni Lee, and Chuck Junek. They all work in membership services as well. Pam Fleck, CTRS works with the ATRA Academy and Jamie Sharpe, CTRS works with social media.

Way to ATRA office and staff!

Your friend,

Danny

ATRA-Lifetime member.