[0.1 CEUs] — Rec Therapy Month Webinar

rtmonthaFebruary is Rec Therapy Month!
I’m presenting a free webinar:
The difference between recreation activities and recreation therapy.
(0.1 CEU) provided.
Date: Wed. Feb. 1, 2017. Time: 7:00 p.m. (eastern time).
Of course, you already know the difference.
If you enjoy the webinar you can get access to replay the webinar at your facility to help educate your co-workers about recreation therapy.
best wishes.
your friend,
Danny.

How RTs can get more recognition.

canstockphoto40132788Problem:

  • Rec therapists (some, but not all) have complained to me over the years that they are not respected and recognized as well as their allied professionals.

My Feelings:

  • I strongly believe that our allied professionals may be advancing more often because they require more continuing education.  Unfortunately, many professionals do not independently continue their education. Therefore, agencies (like hospitals), state license boards, national certification boards have all set a minimum level of required continuing education hours per year.

Some Examples of the Difference in Continuing Education

Recreational therapists must earn 50 continuing education hours in five years in order to maintain their certification with the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC).

Let’s see what other professionals require:

  • Physical Therapists must earn 24 continuing education hours per year to maintain their state license in my state, West Virginia. That is 120 hours in five years. A physical therapist is getting 70 more hours (beyond the 50 hours that Rec Therapists are required) in a five-year period.
  • Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Therapists in West Virginia are required 20 hours of continuing education per year to maintain their state license. That would be a total of 100 hours in a five year period. That is 50 hours (beyond the 50 that RTs are expected to earn for their national certification) in a five-year period.
  • National Certified Counselors (NCC) must earn 80 continuing education hours in five years. That is 30 more continuing education hours (beyond 50 hours that Rec Therapists are required) in a five-year period.
  • Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs) in West Virginia must earn 35 continuing education hours every two years to maintain their license. That is a total of 70 hours every four years. Do you see the difference? A licensed counselor requires 70 hours in four years and a certified rec therapist requires 50 in five years.

I’ve not checked on other professional groups and organizations.

The National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC) appears to be working to encourage RTs to gain more knowledge and skills. They currently offer the specialty certifications (which require 75 hours of continuing education in a five-year period, among other requirements like a graduate degree or advanced certificate courses).

Here is the good news for you.

There are no limits to your continuing education.

You can make a choice to be a leader in the field.  You can earn well above and beyond the minimum 50 hours required by NCTRC.

I’d argue that it might be safer to go the extra mile on hours – just in case one hour isn’t accepted.

Of course, you’re probably aware that I provide online continuing education courses. However, RTs don’t have to go with my program. My program focuses on mental/ behavioral health. RTs may want to seek out other expertise areas and learn more. I’d be glad to help you in your search for those courses and training too.

Are you ready to take your own career to the next level?

I’d like to invite you to check out the self-study CEU courses that I offer Rec Therapists.

Go here: http://www.DannyPettry.com/courses.html

 

Imagine what learning more can do for you in both your personal life and your professional life?

Best wishes and to your success.

Your friend and partner in Rec Therapy,

Danny Pettry.

 

P.s. here is that link again:

Go here: http://www.DannyPettry.com/courses.html

Amazing opportunities coming in 2017!

0001awesome

DannyPettry.com online training program is dedicated to professional recreational therapists.

We’re determined and persistent in helping you. And we’re definitely preferred by recreational therapists as the leader in online trainings for recreational therapists.

We’re going to be rolling out some new amazing training programs in early 2017.

We’re not going to pre-announce these training courses quiet yet. – to keep my new direct competition in the dark from copying us.

But here are some things I can tell you. I asked 2,000 recreational therapists what they wanted. We got a good turnout of answers.

  • 92% of my mailing list wanted our main program. – so we’re definitely going to offer this!
  • 57% of my mailing list wanted the second program. – so we’re going to offer this too!
  • 47.9% wanted the third program. – and we’re going to offer this too.

 

Keep reading emails from my site so you won’t be in the dark about this dynamic programs! If you haven’t done so already – then you can go here to sign-up:

http://www.DannyPettry.com 

A new design

I created a new flyer to help market my CEU program.

I have been sending these out to people.

I also gave them out to people at the ATRA 2016 Conference in Chicago.

Email me if you’d like to get some of these flyers in the mail to give out to other RTs. Be sure to include your full complete mailing list and how many you’d like to have.

Outside cover

tentcard-8.5inx11in-v

Inside cover:

tentcard-8.5inx11in-v

Email me if you’d like to get some of these flyers in the mail to give out to other RTs. Be sure to include your full complete mailing list and how many you’d like to have.

Some Tips on Earning More in Recreational Therapy (a book review).

© Can Stock Photo / tang90246canstockphoto11452270

© Can Stock Photo / tang90246

A book review of Brian Tracy’s (2012) book, Earn What You’re Really Worth: Maximize Your Income at Any Time in Any Market.

By: Danny Pettry

Source:

Tracy, B. (2012). Earn what you’re really worth: maximize your income at any time in any market. Philadelphia, PA: Vanguard Press

Disclaimer:

I [Danny Pettry] do not promise that you’ll earn any additional income from this book review. I am reviewing a book by Brian Tracy on the topic of income. Please note that I do not offer any guarantees for Recreational Therapists.

 

The Author and the Book:

 

Brian Tracy is well-known in the self-development field. I’ve read several of his books in the past, including: Goals! and Eat that Frog! I was browsing the library for leadership books when I accidently found this book and decided to check it out.

I often check out books based on recommendations of other authors. Several of my favorite authors had praise for this book, including:

I know with a list of recommendations from that group that I had to read this book.

Tracy (2012) has 12 chapters with useful tips. This review will cover a brief overview of the chapter and provide practical information for recreational therapists.

 

  • Chapter 1: the new normal

 

The main concept: Change is always happening. There is always new information. Competition is strong.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Be prepared for change. Work at improving your own set of skills to be competent for when change happens. Continue to invest in yourself and your own career. Money is often fault for in the competitive world of healthcare services. Be sure to be a professional who is using evidenced-based practice to demonstrate outcomes. Those services that are not producing outcomes are going to get discontinued.

 

  • Chapter 2: your personal service corporation

 

The main concept: Everything about “you” is a corporation. It consists of your own life mission and goals, personal values, work ethic, skills, abilities, and traits. It is valuable to have your own personal service corporation in gear.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Recreational therapists are often self-aware of who they are and what they want to do. This is why they decided to become a recreational therapist. Be sure to make your own name (insert your name here) a personal brand of excellence.

 

  • Chapter 3: increase your earning potential

The main concept: Be competent in your job. Produce the results that the job requires. Do the most important (big jobs) first on your daily to-do list. Invest your own time on becoming better. Continue to improve your own skills and competencies.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Make sure your recreational therapy services are bringing about measurable results. Here is a sample generic idea of this: Patient has x ability before services (able to sit in chair and participate in social activity for 30 minutes).  Patient participates in recreational therapy services (which appears to be playing cards, but it is strength building).  Outcomes after services: patient now has 2x ability (ability to sit up for the full hour). Results get payment. No results mean no payment. Be sure to invest and prepare for your own future too. What skills might you need in five or ten years?

 

  • Chapter 4: capitalize on your strengths

The main concept: There are certain things you do well. There are other things you might struggle with doing. The focus here is to really develop those skills that you do well, which are marketable. These are the skills that give you a leading edge.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Become a specialist in the area that you do well. It could be assessments, program planning/ goal writing, an intervention, measuring outcomes, documentation. Be the best you can be in the area that you’re already doing well. You could become a paid consultant or trainer in that area.

 

  • Chapter 5: get the right job

The main concept: Be self-aware of the job you really want to have. This is the perfect dream job. Be prepared to get that job. Do what you must to be the best person for the job. Go talk to someone that has the job you want and ask them questions on how they got there.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Recreational therapists are pretty self-aware that they want to be a Recreational Therapist. However, they may have future goals. They might want to become a Manger/ program director, a consultant, works with a certain population, or become an educator. Develop the skills you need to become what you want. Take a person out to lunch who is already working in that job and ask them some questions.

 

  • Chapter 6: the future belongs to the competent

The main concept: Those who produce results get the job and keep the job. Be competent in communication: written (typing documentation, emailing, writing official reports), speaking: to groups, patients, customers, and other people). Be a good listener to find out what they (boss, customers, patients) need and deliver it/ produce it/ create it, make it happen.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Identify the competencies needed to be in the top of your field. Consider getting specialty certifications. Continue to grow and develop your competencies. The skills you have today might not be the skills you’ll need in the future. Stay current of what is happening in the profession.

 

  • Chapter 7: double your productivity

The main concept: Identify the jobs and tasks that must be completed. Make a list of those responsibilities. Do the biggest, toughest, or most important ones first. Be disciplined to work hard and get the job done.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Identify what your employer wants you to do and do it. Manage your time well. Constantly be productive and producing. Of course, on your own leisure time, be sure to identify areas you want to grow and improve. Constantly work on improvement there too. Be disciplined to go the extra mile, learn more, and specialize.

 

  • Chapter 8: practical project management

The main concept: Do projects one at a time. Be sure to identify the results that are needed or the outcomes. Write it down and outline it. Decide who on the team is going to be helping is responsible for each part. Lead the team to success.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: What project are you working on? Danny Pettry: One of my big projects this time of year is the Holiday Play. We start the first day of November. What is the play going to be? What kids in the program will do which part? Who will help with costumes? Who will help with make-up? Who will help the kid learn the lines? Who will help with rehearsals? About mid-December, we deliver a wonderful holiday performance for patient families and administration. We plan ahead to identify therapy treatment goals for each kid as well (interpersonal skills, cognitive skills, affect regulation skills, self-esteem) and many other skills that are measurable and accomplished via the holiday performance. Recreational therapists can do projects and develop their own leadership skills.

 

  • Chapter 9: put people first

The main concept: People are important. Develop your interpersonal skills to the best they can be. All people want to feel validated, important, and worthwhile, included, affirmed, and have some sense of control in their own lives.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Recreational therapists work in the human service field. They are probably pretty apt towards having good people skills. As a reminder, be friendly to all people you meet (at work) and in your personal life too. I doubt any RTs need that reminder. One day any person (neighbor, the facility maintenance/ Gardner, etc.) might have what you want or need. Ethics reminder: that we never take anything or use patients for our own gain.

 

  • Chapter 10: powerful problem solving and decision-making

The main concept: Be an effective problem solver. Identify the problem. Identify the solutions. Seek feedback from others. Implement.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: This sounds a lot like the Recreational Therapy process. Assess the situation (identify the target problem). Collaborate with the treatment team to get therapy goals. Implement the recreational therapy interventions to get the problem-solved. Evaluate the outcomes. Recreational therapists are can be very marketable in other professions too with their ability to go in and assess a situation, prepare a plan, implement the plan, and evaluate the results. That same process could be used for rec therapists for personal self-development as well.

 

  • Chapter 11: get paid more and promoted faster

The main concept: This chapter focuses on dressing for success. Being able to ask for what you want (like a pay increase). It has a large focus on continuing to learn and grown and double your professional knowledge and skills.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Recreational therapists can continue their education in many ways (like my online program DannyPettry.com). NCTRC requires recreational therapists to earn continuing education units that are based on TR knowledge areas. However, do not limit yourself to that alone. Continue to grow and develop other skills (above and beyond that what is required for certification) that could enhance your skills and knowledge as well.

 

  • Chapter 12: perception is everything

The main concept: Develop the right mindset. Gain and demonstrate a positive mental attitude. Be grateful. Meet new people. Continue to develop your skill set.

 

Thoughts for Recreational Therapists: Learn about improving your own attitude (even if you already have a positive attitude). Continue to meet people (professional conferences), attend and participate in your own town or county local events. Advocate for Recreational Therapy on your own time (public speaking) and you’ll also be getting your own name out there.

Conclusion

 

Tracy (2012) offered a lot of tips that are useful towards getting the job a person really wants to have (often which has a higher salary) or getting paid the maximum salary possible. Tracy’s suggestions are fairly simple. They consist of denying the job you want and the salary you want. Identify what skills, knowledge, and competencies are needed for that position. Gain those skills. Be a hard-working person who produces results and outcomes. Over deliver by doing more than what you’re expected. Demonstrate a positive attitude. Be people friendly. Network and grow. Go for it.

 

Bibliography:

Tracy, B. (2012). Earn what you’re really worth: maximize your income at any time in any market. Philadelphia, PA: Vanguard Press

Competent employees are given more work duties (and they are stressed about it)

canstockphoto9309715

There was an interesting article by Bouree Lam in The Atlantic (based on research) (2015, May 22) that indicates that competent people are assigned more work duties.  Bourbee points that that it often causes additional stress on the high-performing employee. Bourbee points that that that the competent person is not always rewarded financially for those efforts and argues that mangers should compensate their high-performing employees.

Danny Pettry thoughts: I argue that the high performing employee very well “IS” being compensated more (over the long-run). The economy goes up and down. Sometimes employees are let go. I imagine those drivers (hard-workers) are going to be the ones that will turn out on top (keeping jobs and salary) and probably more apt to be the ones who will obtain new jobs (salary again) if they had to be let go or if the company closed. These drivers obtain the knew jobs because they have already built a Brand Name for themselves as in “Jennifer” is already well-known as being a hard-working, competent, person who gets results. In conclusion: it is stressful. Do the work. Make a great impact on the world. One day when you look back, you’ll more apt be satisfied with what you’ve done. Deal with the stress of being assigned more.

Danny Pettrys advice: Quote: “Fortune favors the prepared mind.” – Louis Pasteur

Continuing your education and continue building your skills. The knowledge and skills you have today may be okay. However, the world is always changing. Go ahead and learn more to be prepared.

Danny Pettry: My tip for Recreational Therapy mangers: compensate more if you have the power to do so. I’d also like to point out that a lot of research based indicates that pay (extrinsic rewards)  for performance is not always the most effective. Intrinsic motivation is the real key to results. Read Daniel Pink’s Drive or Decie and Flaste’s why we do what we do. Rec Therapy mangers could give small tokens of appreciation: a pizza party, a small gift card from amazon, or other creative things.

The article can be found here:

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/05/being-a-go-getter-is-no-fun/393863/?utm_source=atlfb 

Ptarmigan West’s “Recreation Therapy Learning Opportunities”

 

Ptarmigan West’s “Recreation Therapy Learning Opportunities”
Barbara Bond-Howard, MA, CTRS/R
Ptarmigan West has been about  education ever since July, 1990.  We have educated thousands of students across the United States and Canada with our video/DVD series.  More recently we have been about seminars and on-line learning opportunities for continuing education for re-certification.  Specialty Certification has come to Recreation Therapists and most people say they find it difficult to get enough CEUs in the area of their specialty and therefore, do not pursue it.  We wanted to help with that and provide cost effective CEUs for our field.
Our live seminars are always small groups of 10-18 therapists where we tackle difficult topics. They are full day classes.  Current classes of topics  & locations can be found at:  http:www.PtarmiganWest.com
Our on-line classes are both lecture and self-study.  They are completed on a platform that lets you watch a video and then complete homework.  All homework assignments are web-based and we fully embrace the idea the  “E-Learning Manifesto” which says that CEUs done on-line should give the learner an opportunity to use the internet to go deeper into a topic thereby becoming more fully vested in the learning opportunity.  Just like on social media you might lose track of time by clicking and reading, your  CEU classes should help you become engrossed in what you have just been learning about.  Our aim is by the time you finish each class, you will go away with something that you can immediately use with your patients or residents.  It’s an opportunity to fall back in love with your profession.  You know, the reason you went in to this field to begin with.
I know, I’m a bit of an “education junkie” myself.  I typically have over 100 CEU hours at my certification renewal time.  I find that taking classes keeps me from burning out.  It gives me new ways to look at doing “the same thing”.  I remember a few decades ago, before the internet was a viable option, when I got my last CEU 2 weeks before my renewal.  I sweated that one out as I waited and waited for some CEU opportunity to show itself that was priced reasonably.   Times have changed.  There are many opportunities now.  My hope for you as you take classes is that it’s not just a CEU that you need for re-certification..  These opportunities  should:
  1. help you get better at your profession.
  2. create a new opportunity to do the same thing in a different way.
  3. learn something new that excites you.
  4. remind you why you wanted to become a recreation therapist
I love teaching.  I love learning.  There’s something in both of these that gives my life energy.  Life is very full:  Family, friends, work, and play.   Don’t let CEUs exist because you HAVE to have them, but rather, because you CAN have them.   You can find Ptarmigan West’s on-line classes at  www.RecreationTherapyElearning.com